Fabulous New Book Reviews: Spring 2018

Hello fellow book lovers and welcome to my first review round-up for 2018. Spring is nearly here and I’m so ready for the new season to start flirting outrageously with us (sunshine, flowers and fewer layers does a lot for me). There’s some really great new release reads out at the moment so I’m thrilled to write these fabulous new book reviews for you. If you’re off on a new adventure this spring, I’d definitely recommend adding these four titles to your devices (or, you know, buy actual physical copies of). Enjoy!

📌 Looking for some more fabulous reviews? Check out my previous book blogs here.


book reviews The House Of Impossible Beauties

The House of Impossible Beauties by Joseph Cassara

UK release date: 1st February 2018

I studied film theory at university, primarily focussing on queer and gender theory, so suffice to say I saw Paris Is Burning many, many times. If you haven’t seen this ground-breaking (and quite controversial) documentary from the early 90s (it captured New York’s ball scene in the 80s scene, which  Madonna s̶t̶o̶l̶e̶ ̶f̶r̶o̶m̶  paid homage to with Vogue) then you definitely should watch it first. This novel is loosely based on one of the most iconic drag “houses” from the scene: the House of Xtravaganza. Virgin and Angie (called Angel in the book) are two of the most iconic people to appear in the documentary and it’s interesting to imagine their lives against the backdrop of 70s and 80s New York. The ball scene barely features in the novel but it hums in the background of their lives. Sadly, even if you haven’t seen the documentary it’s not hard to predict how the story ends – but I was still in tears throughout the last couple of chapters (I don’t think anyone under 45 can even begin to imagine what it was like to live through the first decade of AIDS). I found the structure of the book made it a little hard to get into the story at times (it’s no surprise that it started out as a short story) but I think it’s still an interesting read for fans of queer history.

Buy it now from:

Foyles

Waterstones

Amazon

Book reviews Everything I Know About Love

Everything I Know About Love by Dolly Alderton

UK release date: 1st February 2018

This is a witty and tender read that makes it easy to inhale in a sitting or two. I usually nod off with a book every night after 20 minutes but I was sitting up to all hours, chortling with awkward amusement at how familiar some of these stories felt to me. As I’ve never been a Sunday Times reader, I hadn’t heard of the author before (apparently she used to be their dating columnist) but seeing as Alderton worked on the E4 TV series Fresh Meat for a bit, she’s alright in my books. Taking a wander through her life, the Alderton recounts all the hilarious mistakes she’s made (and some of the not-so-funny problems she’s struggled with) in order to impart her charming bits of wisdom upon us. It sounds pretty condescending to call her a younger/posher version of Caitlin Moran, but I ADORE Moran so to be even placed in the same sentence as her is pretty impressive by my standards. It’s one of those books you want to buy for all your friends as soon as you’ve read it; hence why it is selling like HOTCAKES! They can’t print new copies of it fast enough for bookstores in Central London right now. Get your hands on a copy too as this is a fabulous travel read for this spring.

Buy it now from:

Foyles

Waterstones

Amazon

Book reviews A Guide For Murdered Children

A Guide for Murdered Children by Sarah Sparrow

UK release date: 20th March 2018

The name grabs you, right? Well, this book would make a great film and I’ve been wondering since I read this book months ago whether the producers would keep its strong name (I suppose I’ll just have to wait and see). Welcome to the world of Willow Wylde, a former homicide detective who is haunted – not by the gruesome cases he once investigated but by the other-worldly instincts that made him so great but also destroyed him. As Wylde slowly discovers what these “abilities” are he realises that true justice does exist: murdered children can return to the world of the living temporarily in order to destroy their killers. It’s Wylde’s job to guide them, in an AA-style support group, on their mission but these are some very young souls and they need an awful lot of guidance. This is a refreshingly dark fantasy novel about karma that makes you wish were true.

Buy it now from:

Foyles

Waterstones

Amazon

Book reviews Clean

Clean by Juno Dawson

UK release date: 5th April 2018

Apparently, this is a children’s book? Well, Young Adult, which these days means shooting up, shitting the bed and calling everyone the c-word apparently. Oh, I sound very old writing that. I, of course, would have bloody loved this book when I was a teen and I still enjoyed it now. I’ve been wanting to read some of Dawson’s other novels for a while now so I jumped at the opportunity to download this one when it arrived on Netgalley. It’s actually quite impressive how Dawson manages to write about the vapid and insanely privileged world of millennial rich kids while also making us like the protagonist. I mean, I don’t really sympathise with her (it’s kinda hard to) but I do enjoy hanging out with her for 400-or-so pages. For a novel about addiction, it’s not too judgey and has a pretty interesting message about our modern lives. I can’t wait to read more from this author.

Buy it now from:

Foyles

Waterstones

Amazon

Other new release books I’ve read

 

📚 What’s the best book you read this winter? Comment below and let me know 👇

 

📌 Looking for some more fabulous reviews? Check out my previous book blogs here.

 

 

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